Visiting the Louvre with Kids

Many people are intimidated by the thought of taking young children to museums; we think nothing of it. We feel that teaching our kids about art makes them more well-rounded individuals. At the Louvre children are always welcome and there are a multitude of treasures to educate them and amuse their curiosities.

Tickets and Entry

Children under 18 are free and we recommend buying tickets in advance from the museums website as the queue can be quite daunting. When you do so, you bypass the line and get access to the pyramid at the time stipulated on your ticket.

If you happen to be in Paris the first Sunday of every month, or on Bastille Day, the Louvre is free for all to enter, and the queue reflects this. A few years ago we found ourselves in Paris the first Sunday in July, went to check the line, and it was an estimated 4 hour wait. My wife was very pregnant with twins at the time and someone rushed over to us and explained that no pregnant woman would be waiting in line so we were ushered in immediately. We got lucky on that one, but if you want to challenge the queue with young kids to save a few €, do so at your own risk.

Getting Around

If you are travelling with babies, we highly recommend baby carriers. The Palais du Louvre was a palace designed long before accessibility for wheelchairs or strollers was considered important. You can do it with a stroller, but it will mean that you spend a considerable amount of time looking for lifts or carrying it up and down stairs.

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Sculptures!

Take Breaks

There are 14 different cafes, restaurants, and snack kiosks scattered throughout the museum and if people are getting tired, don’t be afraid to take a break. You may not want a formal sit down lunch, but a pastry or soft drink will go a long way to maintaining kid’s enthusiasm.

Something For Everyone, But…

The Louvre has more than enough masterpieces of history and culture to entertain me for days. My wife and I travelling alone once spent a day and a half inside the Louvre during a visit to Paris. With our son, we stayed entirely in the Denon Wing and that is where you will see all the famous highlights.

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Great Sphinx of Tanis
Victoire_de_Samothrace_-_vue_de_trois-quart_gauche,_gros_plan_de_la_statue_(2)
credit: commons.wikimedia.org via Lyokoi88
Front_views_of_the_Venus_de_Milo
credit: commons.wikimedia.org via Livioandronico2013

A couple tips, do not put kids on your shoulders to see the Mona Lisa as security will be all over you in seconds. Also, turn around, The Wedding at Cana is one of my favourite paintings in the Louvre and perhaps the most overlooked.

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Famous painting that everyone came to see.

 

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The Wedding at Cana. My back would currently be toward the Mona Lisa.
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Coronation of Napoleon

Leonidas at Thermopylae was one of my son’s favourite paintings. He was six at the time of our visit and was enthralled by the story of Leonidas and my wife looked at me with a gleam of new found respect in her eyes as I shared the story of the Battle of Theropylae with him. She was terribly disappointed once I told her it was the premise for the film 300.

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He had seen Raft of the Medusa on a program called Museum Secrets and was really excited to see it.
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Liberty Leading the People

The Rundown

Places like the Louvre will define your family travels. Either you can take your kids and challenge them intellectually, or you can skip the Louvre and may never have a chance to return. We prefer to try and balance our activities so that everyone gets to see and do things that they will enjoy.

For some ideas about things to do with Kids in Paris, including kid friendly activities surrounding the Louvre to turn your visit into a great family day, you know what to do. Paris – 3 Surprisingly Kid Friendly Days (and one trap)

Happy and safe travels.

PS. This blog can also be reached via #CulturedKids.

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7 Comments Add yours

  1. My kids actually love art galleries. I think you’re right – if you get them used to going at an early age, it just becomes a normal part of family life.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. pigeonpairandme says:

      Great to re-read this post as part of #CulturedKids. You’ve prompted me: I need to schedule in some more museums for half term!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Don’t tell anyone, but I don’t think we will be visiting a single museum during the upcoming half term. That might be a firts! We will be visiting Budapest and are hoping for sunchine and outdoor stuff. Closest we will likely get is the House of Terror, unless it rains a bunch, then we will probably scramble for indoor stuff to do. The highlight for the kids will likely be the waterslides, zoo, and baths so I am sure they won’t be longing for any museums 😉

        Like

  2. bavariansojourn says:

    Galleries were always a big part of my life when we were small, so I have just naturally taken mine to them too. I think that some can be more child friendly than others (my favourite is still Louisiana in Denmark to take them to – it has the best kids work shop ever!), but we still go! Have yet to set foot in the Louvre with them though. I need to go to Paris again soon. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. How right you are, if you treat going to art galleries as normal then normal it will be! PS The Marriage at Cana is one of my favourites too #CulturedKids

    Like

  4. Helena says:

    I have visited France numerous times but can’t recall visiting the Louvre. Thank you for giving me a tour. #CulturedKids

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Annabel Kirk says:

    I must admit the size of the Louvre concerns me slightly but I guess you just need to do your research in advance when you’re visiting with kids (or without them for that matter!). I’m taking my kids to the National Gallery in London next week and I’ve planned which bits we’re going to see, I can’t wait!

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